About Jerry Hankins MD

Check out the latest post from Dr. Jerry Hankins:

Welcome to Dr. Jerry Hankins’ main website. In addition to this website, Dr. Hankins has additional web pages also. One of his main websites is JerryHankinsMD. This post will include information on what you can find over at JerryHankinsMD.com. The homepage of the website includes biographical information on Dr. Jerry Hankins. He attended Delta State University for his undergraduate and then Mississippi State University for their Microbiology Masters Program. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is where Dr. Jerry Hankins earned his medical degree. Additional biographical information can be found on the website. The blog page of the website includes medical news to consider. The latest post is about ways to combat fatigue without relying on caffeine. It’s definitely worth a read! The website has a contact page for reaching Dr. Hankins. A Google Map of Pell City, Alabama has been embedded to explore the area where Dr. Hankins works. The map is interactive so that site visitors can click, drag, and move around the content. Page visitors can also zoom in and out on the map. More information will be added in the coming months. An RSS feed on the website pulls the latest health news from MedicalNewsToday, which is regularly updated for new, fresh content. The link section on the website can bring you to Dr. Jerry Hankins’ other pages such as this one. You can access his art and photography page as well as his poetry page. The website will continue to be updated each month so be sure to check back for updates. Below is a screen capture of the JerryHankinsMD.com homepage.

This is a website screen capture for one of Dr. Jerry Hankins' website.

Jerry Hankins MD’s Website

from Dr. Jerry Hankins http://ift.tt/1nyU8Xi

Advertisements

Dr. Jerry Hankins About Jerry Hankins MD

Welcome to Dr. Jerry Hankins’ main website. In addition to this website, Dr. Hankins has additional web pages also. One of his main websites is JerryHankinsMD. This post will include information on what you can find over at JerryHankinsMD.com. The homepage of the website includes biographical information on Dr. Jerry Hankins. He attended Delta State University for his undergraduate and then Mississippi State University for their Microbiology Masters Program. The University of Mississippi School of Medicine is where Dr. Jerry Hankins earned his medical degree. Additional biographical information can be found on the website. The blog page of the website includes medical news to consider. The latest post is about ways to combat fatigue without relying on caffeine. It’s definitely worth a read! The website has a contact page for reaching Dr. Hankins. A Google Map of Pell City, Alabama has been embedded to explore the area where Dr. Hankins works. The map is interactive so that site visitors can click, drag, and move around the content. Page visitors can also zoom in and out on the map. More information will be added in the coming months. An RSS feed on the website pulls the latest health news from MedicalNewsToday, which is regularly updated for new, fresh content. The link section on the website can bring you to Dr. Jerry Hankins’ other pages such as this one. You can access his art and photography page as well as his poetry page. The website will continue to be updated each month so be sure to check back for updates. Below is a screen capture of the JerryHankinsMD.com homepage.

This is a website screen capture for one of Dr. Jerry Hankins' website.

Jerry Hankins MD’s Website

from Dr. Jerry Hankins http://ift.tt/1nyU8Xi
Dr. Jerry Hankins

Why Poetry Is So Important – Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog Page Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Poetry Blog

Dr. Jerry Hankins Poetry Blog

Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Poetry Blog

While you may not be able to remember many names of the poems you read in school, you can at least remembering reading poetry at some point between kindergarten and high school graduation.  In a world where math and science skills are in high demand, it’s easy to forget the important role poetry plays in education.

Poetry helps children want to create something.  There is an apparent rhythm and beat to most poetry and, while this rhythm might not be as musical as children are used to, they will recognize it and are likely to become intrigued by it.  They will start to question the rhyme and syntax and structure and why certain patterns fall the way they do.  At this point, writing becomes less like literal written words on a page, and more like an art form that is appealing to children who have never dealt with poetry before.  Even if children do not understand all of the words in a piece or the meaning of a poem, they will still start to analyze the structure of it.

While often thought of as something associated with literature or poetry, critical analysis is an extremely important skill to have even for basic writing and editing purposes.  There should always be some sort of flow to a piece of writing.  While the structure of different texts or papers is bound to vary, poetry can help children realize that an absence of some sort of textual structure—even a structure that is intended to break the rules of grammar and punctuation—takes away from a piece of writing.  Honing critical analysis skills through exposure to poetry will increase children’s future abilities to read critically, edit, and ultimately develop their own overall voice and writing style.

Writing also helps children share their ideas.  Poetry lets people express themselves individually while simultaneously realizing that they are part of a bigger community.  Children, especially ones who may have experienced something negative at a young age, need to be able to express themselves, share their feelings, and hear other peoples’ stories as well. In a similar way, if a child is overjoyed, he or she should be able to find a way to communicate that as well.  A few lines in a poem can completely change the way a person looks at an experience.  Because of this, poetry is often seen as something that promotes learning and personal growth.

Ultimately, poetry creates a space for speaking and listening.  It can be used as an outlet for overwhelming emotions, as an aid to children on the path of self-discovery, or act as a learning tool for enhancing academic skills.  Poetry can help children introduce themselves to their classmates, explain a feeling, share a story.  Math, science, and general writing skills are important, but poetry needs to have its place in schools as well because it gives a form of personal expression to children and helps them to better understand the different people and  events in world around them.

from Dr. Jerry Hankins Poetry http://ift.tt/1btKu8O
Dr. Jerry Hankins

From Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Poetry Website: Why Poetry Is So Important – Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog Page

Dr. Jerry Hankins:

Dr. Jerry Hankins Poetry Blog

Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Poetry Blog

While you may not be able to remember many names of the poems you read in school, you can at least remembering reading poetry at some point between kindergarten and high school graduation.  In a world where math and science skills are in high demand, it’s easy to forget the important role poetry plays in education.

Poetry helps children want to create something.  There is an apparent rhythm and beat to most poetry and, while this rhythm might not be as musical as children are used to, they will recognize it and are likely to become intrigued by it.  They will start to question the rhyme and syntax and structure and why certain patterns fall the way they do.  At this point, writing becomes less like literal written words on a page, and more like an art form that is appealing to children who have never dealt with poetry before.  Even if children do not understand all of the words in a piece or the meaning of a poem, they will still start to analyze the structure of it.

While often thought of as something associated with literature or poetry, critical analysis is an extremely important skill to have even for basic writing and editing purposes.  There should always be some sort of flow to a piece of writing.  While the structure of different texts or papers is bound to vary, poetry can help children realize that an absence of some sort of textual structure—even a structure that is intended to break the rules of grammar and punctuation—takes away from a piece of writing.  Honing critical analysis skills through exposure to poetry will increase children’s future abilities to read critically, edit, and ultimately develop their own overall voice and writing style.

Writing also helps children share their ideas.  Poetry lets people express themselves individually while simultaneously realizing that they are part of a bigger community.  Children, especially ones who may have experienced something negative at a young age, need to be able to express themselves, share their feelings, and hear other peoples’ stories as well. In a similar way, if a child is overjoyed, he or she should be able to find a way to communicate that as well.  A few lines in a poem can completely change the way a person looks at an experience.  Because of this, poetry is often seen as something that promotes learning and personal growth.

Ultimately, poetry creates a space for speaking and listening.  It can be used as an outlet for overwhelming emotions, as an aid to children on the path of self-discovery, or act as a learning tool for enhancing academic skills.  Poetry can help children introduce themselves to their classmates, explain a feeling, share a story.  Math, science, and general writing skills are important, but poetry needs to have its place in schools as well because it gives a form of personal expression to children and helps them to better understand the different people and  events in world around them.

from Dr. Jerry Hankins Poetry http://ift.tt/1btKu8O

Latest from Jerry Hankins MD (Dr. Jerry Hankins):Caffeine-Free Remedies to Combat Fatigue – Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog

Recent from JerryHankinsMD.com:

This is the blog page for Dr. Jerry Hankins. This  is a free stock image of a girl sleeping for an article about staying alert.

Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog

Caffeine-Free Remedies to Combat Fatigue

When you haven’t had your recommended seven hours of sleep, reaching for the first caffeinated beverage you see in the morning becomes almost instinctual.  Unfortunately, not sleeping well and then relying on caffeine to get you through the day can contribute to a cycle of sleepless nights and stressful days.  The effects of caffeine can take up to eight hours to wear off, causing you to feel jittery, anxious and affect your overall quality of sleep.  Instead of reaching for the caffeine next time you’re feeling the strain of a sleepless night, try a natural, caffeine-free remedy.

Take a Break and Take a Walk

If you have a job where you sit in front of a computer screen all day or are continuously reading, make sure you are taking breaks regularly.  Constant straining of the eyes can worsen feelings of fatigue.  Make sure that you are periodically looking away from your computer screen or text and giving your eyes a chance to relax.

If you are still feeling fatigued, consider taking a brisk 10-minute walk.  Movement increases the oxygen flow through your veins, to your muscles and to your brain.  Breathing deeply will also raise blood oxygen levels in your body.  This can improve your overall energy level by slowing down your heart rate, lowering your blood pressure and improving circulation throughout your body.

Lighting

Dim lightening can aggravate fatigue and even bring on feelings of depression.  Turning up the lights in the room you are in can increase alertness and make you feel less tired.

However, if you’re feeling extremely fatigued, the best decision might require turning down the lights and taking a quick power nap, if possible.  Try taking a five to twenty-five minute nap.  Set an alarm to make sure you do not sleep much longer than half an hour.  Be sure not to nap too close to your bedtime, and do not take more than one a day as this can also upset sleep patterns.  If taking a nap is not an option, consider closing your eyes just and resting quietly for ten minutes.

Have a Snack

Drinking caffeine when you have not eaten much can upset your stomach.  Instead of choosing caffeine, which will ultimately make you feel worse later in the day, try eating a healthy snack.  Sugary snacks can be a problem, and can cause “sugar lows,” which can produce lethargy, after consumption.  Try a healthier snack, like peanut butter, nuts, or fresh veggies, to wake you up and keep you focused.

from JerryHankinsMD.com http://ift.tt/MgDCjp

Caffeine-Free Remedies to Combat Fatigue – Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog – Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog – Jerry Hankins MD.

This is the blog page for Dr. Jerry Hankins. This  is a free stock image of a girl sleeping for an article about staying alert.

Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog

Caffeine-Free Remedies to Combat Fatigue

When you haven’t had your recommended seven hours of sleep, reaching for the first caffeinated beverage you see in the morning becomes almost instinctual.  Unfortunately, not sleeping well and then relying on caffeine to get you through the day can contribute to a cycle of sleepless nights and stressful days.  The effects of caffeine can take up to eight hours to wear off, causing you to feel jittery, anxious and affect your overall quality of sleep.  Instead of reaching for the caffeine next time you’re feeling the strain of a sleepless night, try a natural, caffeine-free remedy.

Take a Break and Take a Walk

If you have a job where you sit in front of a computer screen all day or are continuously reading, make sure you are taking breaks regularly.  Constant straining of the eyes can worsen feelings of fatigue.  Make sure that you are periodically looking away from your computer screen or text and giving your eyes a chance to relax.

If you are still feeling fatigued, consider taking a brisk 10-minute walk.  Movement increases the oxygen flow through your veins, to your muscles and to your brain.  Breathing deeply will also raise blood oxygen levels in your body.  This can improve your overall energy level by slowing down your heart rate, lowering your blood pressure and improving circulation throughout your body.

Lighting

Dim lightening can aggravate fatigue and even bring on feelings of depression.  Turning up the lights in the room you are in can increase alertness and make you feel less tired.

However, if you’re feeling extremely fatigued, the best decision might require turning down the lights and taking a quick power nap, if possible.  Try taking a five to twenty-five minute nap.  Set an alarm to make sure you do not sleep much longer than half an hour.  Be sure not to nap too close to your bedtime, and do not take more than one a day as this can also upset sleep patterns.  If taking a nap is not an option, consider closing your eyes just and resting quietly for ten minutes.

Have a Snack

Drinking caffeine when you have not eaten much can upset your stomach.  Instead of choosing caffeine, which will ultimately make you feel worse later in the day, try eating a healthy snack.  Sugary snacks can be a problem, and can cause “sugar lows,” which can produce lethargy, after consumption.  Try a healthier snack, like peanut butter, nuts, or fresh veggies, to wake you up and keep you focused.

from JerryHankinsMD.com http://ift.tt/MgDCjp
Dr. Jerry Hankins – Jerry Hankins MD

Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Recent: Importance of Arts Education – Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Blog

Dr. Jerry Hankins:

This is the art blog for Dr. Jerry Hankins with news and updates about art.

Dr. Jerry Hankins’ Art Blog

 

Younger Children and Art Education

There has been a noticeable change in the education curriculum in the United States over the past few years.  Schools are being told to focus on common core subjects, like math, reading, and writing skills, and stray away form elective-type courses. Art education courses have fallen into the category of classes that are considered enjoyable but ultimately unnecessary.  As a result, art classes are being removed from some high schools and it won’t be long before the classes are removed from middle and elementary school curricula as well.  However, one has to wonder if the officials making the decision to remove art education from schools have really considered all of the benefits art classes give to children, especially children who are in the critical developmental stages of their lives.

Language and Vocabulary Skills

Just talking about art with a child helps him or her learn and begin to recognize the names of many different shapes and colors.  Making art also helps children remember the names of different activities.  For example they can paint or draw a picture of themselves playing soccer or helping cook dinner.  Through creating different pieces, children can recognize the activities they enjoy or do daily, convey a message, and describe the method they use to depict each activity.

Motor Skills and Visual Learning

Without even knowing it, a child is enhancing his or her motor skills when using a paintbrush, drawing, or even cutting different shapes out of a piece of paper.  All of these activities work to increase dexterity in children, which they will need when they begin to learn how to write.

Likewise, activities such as playing with clay or threading beads enhance a child’s visual-spatial perception skills.  It is apparent now more than ever that children are learning through visual cues and this is a good thing.  Children should be able to see the world as something three-dimensional, not just as something that exists through letters and numbers.  Art education teaches children how to understand and criticize visual information.

Decision Making

Art also helps children develop decision making skills at a young age. When children decide what activity, memory, or emotion they want to convey in an art piece, they begin to practice other parts of the decision making process as well, specifically critical-thinking and problem solving skills.  As they create art, children are constantly exploring ideas, thinking about how to physically create those ideas and make them visually appealing, and deciding what tools they will need to use to complete the task.  This echoes the process of decision making in which individuals must figure out what they want to do, how they’re going to do it, and what they will need to reach their goal.

from Dr. Jerry Hankins Art & Photography http://ift.tt/1hgHZsB